Heineken 0.0% video campaign — a case study with Facial Coding

In the world of advertising, one of the most crucial indicators of advertisement success is what emotions it evokes. Of course, it’s important for an ad to be noticeable and to draw consumers’ attention, but (especially for video ads) emotions seem to be the key.

Entertainment level, based on 27 participants using Facial Coding

How to discover those insights?

There are several approaches to do so: conduct a survey in the control group, meet participants to talk with them (ask about opinion, see their reactions), or… use facial coding. Due to Wikipedia: “Facial coding is the process of measuring human emotions through facial expressions”. All these expressions can be detected by a computer using a simple webcam. Algorithms analyze the shape and movement of the main facial features (eyebrows, eyes, mouth) and translate it all into human emotions — joy, sadness, fear, disgust, etc.

Heineken video campaign

To conduct this research we chose 5 Heineken ads, including 4 Heineken 0.0% ads (the message of these four was similar). 27 participants were asked to watch those ads one by one (display for each tester was set in random order) and after each of them to answer a question: How do you feel about this advertisement?

  • Saw the first time, I LIKED IT!
  • Saw the first time, I DIDN’T LIKE IT
  • I saw it before, I LIKED IT!
  • I saw it before, I DIDN’T LIKE IT

Ad1: Heineken 0.0, Now You Can: Presentation

Results: Click here to see study results live

Ad2: Heineken 0.0, Now You Can: Gas Station

Results: Click here to see study results live

Ad3: Heineken 0.0, Now You Can: Parking

Results: Click here to see study results live

Ad4: Heineken 0.0, Now You Can: Locker Room

Results: Click here to see study results live

Now let’s compare the 4 ads above with the most popular Heineken ad (from another campaign).

Ad5: Heineken Commercial Fridge

Results: Click here to see study results live

And the winner is…

It’s clear that “Heineken Commercial Fridge” brings the most entertainment to viewers. It’s also easy to discover which advertisement from the 0.0% campaign is the winning one (Parking) as it’s entertainment level increases higher than the lowest ones.

Entertainment level, based on 27 participants using Facial Coding

To sum things up

What are the advantages of our solution?

  • Combining insights from eye-tracking, emotion recognition and declarative surveys in one tool.
  • Participants can make the test at home, in the natural, non-corrupted laboratory environment.
  • You can compare answers for different target groups by easily filtering them, i.e. how an ad is perceived by men and women or in different age groups (this option wasn’t enabled in this study) or filter results by tags that you can create by yourself (like tag by the survey answers).
  • It’s easy to observe the climax (and whether one exists or changes the perception of an ad).
  • It may happen, that a participant didn’t realize that he/she liked an ad or he/she deliberately answered in a way that was misleading or did not want to admit liking the ad. Thanks to this kind of study we are able to answer on the behavioral level, not declarative.
  • It allows you to save money before launching the campaign — you can place a higher budget on the ads that had the highest score.
  • Results are provided as soon, as a tester finishes the task. That means that the whole study can be conducted within one day.

Still hungry? OK! Let’s compare the facial analysis insight with the survey results.

  • “parking” means Ad3: Heineken 0.0, Now You Can: Parking
  • “gas” means Ad2: Heineken 0.0, Now You Can: Gas Station
  • “locker” means Ad4: Heineken 0.0, Now You Can: Locker Room
  • “presentation” means Ad1: Heineken 0.0, Now You Can: Presentation
  • “fridge” means Ad5: Heineken Commercial Fridge
  • “1” means “Saw first time, I LIKED IT!”
  • “2” means “Saw first time, I DIDN’T LIKE IT”
  • “3” means “I saw it before, I LIKED IT!”
  • “4” means “I saw it before, I DIDN’T LIKE IT”

--

--

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store
Adam Cellary

I love to engage in interesting and forward-looking projects. I am a mixture of scrum master interested in startups with strong technical knowledge